Satellites to study climate change?

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sostenibilitat, telecomunicacions

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per Servei de Comunicació i Promoció
Abril 2010

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The European Space Agency launched the SMOS satellite in November 2009. Researchers from the UPC monitor its sensors. The mission, the first to be led by Spain, will enable more precise forecasts regarding climate change.

Alessandra Monerris. Radiometry Group. Department of Signal Theory and Communications

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Alessandra Monerris thinks that research requires a series of skills and abilities: ‘dedication, perseverance, the ability to synthesise information, the capacity to work as part of a team, an open mind, a willingness to wonder why things are the way they are, not to mention independence and initiative!’

On 2 November 2009, the European Space Agency launched the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. The group led by researcher Adriano Camps, from the UPC’s Department of Signal Theory and Communications, participated in the mission, which was the first to be led by Spain and will enable more precise forecasts regarding climate change. Monerris defended her doctoral thesis within the framework of the activities leading up to the satellite launching. She is currently the director of the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre (SMOS-BEC).